Top 10: Best Tile Saw For Homeowners Doing DIY Projects

best tile saw

If you’re planning a tiling project, investing in a great saw is critical. Additionally, once you have a tile saw, you’ll find all sorts of projects for it! Don’t underbuy; running large floor tile through a small saw can turn them into the little engine that just hums.

Be certain to review your manual and learn how to change blades, add water, make angle cuts and change the degree of your table for mitering. Take care of your saw, keep it clean, and you can enjoy this tool for years to come.

1. DeWalt D24000/D24000S Heavy-Duty 10-inch Wet Tile Saw with Stand

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DeWalt has been around for nearly 100 years and is a trustworthy manufacturer of durable tools. The D24000S tile saw has plenty of deck space for long cuts. You’ll have room for tiles up to 24 inches and diagonal cuts up to 18 inches. Additionally, this saw can do plunge cuts, ideal for getting around floor registers and other obstacles.

This saw allows plenty of clearance and offers over 3 inches of cutting height. If you need to cut pavers, this saw will work. Review your manual for blade changes and water requirements.

While many small tile saws run the circular blade through standing water to supply water for the cut, DeWalt includes a pump and dual nozzles to apply water throughout the cut. The cutting cart can be detached for easy cleaning of tile debris.

The DeWalt D24000 and D24000S are basically the same saw; the S version has a stand. When cutting ceramic tile, the size and construction of the stand is critical. Tile saws can be heavy, especially once you add the water, and if they get bumped or knocked, they can tip. This stand is 30 inches tall.

You can save yourself a bit of money by purchasing the saw alone and building yourself a stand with adjustable sawhorses and an old door or a plank. For those at the extreme ends of height, this is a great choice and will save you the risk of back pain or injury.

Related: Top 10 Best Tile Cutter Reviews

2. QEP 83200Q 24″ Bridge Saw

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QEP has been around for over 30 years and specializes in stone, porcelain and tile installation products. Their tile saw line includes everything from 4″ handheld saws to 30″ bridge saws.

The 83200Q 24″ bridge saw features a 1 horsepower motor and multiple water sources for constant moisture to protect your saw blade and motor. The deck will hold a 24″ tile and can cut diagonally to 18″. The pivot rail makes miter cuts easy, moving smoothly from 90 to 45 degrees as needed.

This is a bridge saw, so rather than pushing the tile through the blade path, you draw the blade to you. Be sure to thoroughly review your manual for safe use and handling of the bridge mechanism.

The 83200Q comes with a folding stand that has casters at one end for easy positioning. Per the website, this saw is not sold without the stand. However, some users find the stand produces a lot of chatter during the cutting process, so you’ll need to determine if you want to use it or move the saw, which weighs in at 83 pounds.

3. QEP 22900Q 7″ Power Pro 1 HP Tile Saw

best wet tile saw for DIY

The 22900Q is a traditional home use DIY saw, in that you push the tile through the blade path to cut it. This is a 7″ saw, so sending large tile through it will be a challenge and may result in bad cuts.

The table of the 22900Q tilts for miter cuts and the cutting guide features an angle jig for diagonal cuts, a nice feature if you’re using subway tile and want a herringbone pattern.

Tile saws feature a guard and a blade. The blade position is fixed and the guard is movable. It’s easy to get a lot of tile debris on the table of your saw and can cause problems when moving the guard by jamming up under the guard. Because these guards are generally plastic, they can flex and be hard to adjust.

The guard on the 22900Q features a simple adjusting tool; simply lift the handle and slide the guard, then lock it back in place when you’ve reached the right dimension. For best use of this guard, keep your tile saw deck as clean and free of debris as possible.

4. Chicago Electric 2.5 Horsepower 10″ Industrial Tile/Brick Saw

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If you’re planning to make a lot of cuts, work with glass or porcelain tile, or need a saw to cut bricks, this is the best tile saw for the money. However, there is a lot of power in this tool with 2.5 hp, so review your manual and be careful!

Chicago Electric power tools are generally sold through Harbor Freight. It should be noted that getting replacement parts can be a challenge according to some users.

If you’ve never assembled a power tool or don’t have much experience with heavy duty power tools, you’ll want to buy an all-in-one unit. The best tile saw you can get is one that starts when you need it!

This saw features a 24″ cutting capacity and has a swiveling head for bevel cuts. It features a diagonal jig for angle cuts. The saw height gives you space for bricks up to 3.5″ thick.

It should be noted that this saw weighs in at over 80 pounds. It doesn’t come with a stand, so you’ll want to set up something sturdy for your tile cutting project.

5. SKIL 3550-02 7-Inch Wet Tile Saw with HydroLock Water Containment System

best tile saw for the money

SKIL tools offer DIYers an excellent line of small tools for personal projects and small jobs. This saw features a sliding panel that will work on either side of the saw for support of large tiles and a crank handle on the guide for precise movement and cutting dimensions.

The SKIL 3550-02 adds water to the cutting process by drawing the blade through a trough of water. However, if you’ve ever used a small saw and found yourself soaked and a little cranky by the end of your cutting process, you’ll really appreciate the HydroLock feature. This guard captures and returns overspray to the reservoir.

Your SKIL tile saw has sturdy rubber feet, a built-in cord wrap and an adjustable aluminum deck for corrosion free miter cuts and safe transport. It’s important to note that your saw will be quite heavy when full of water and off-balance once it’s cleaned out.

This unbalanced weight factor will take some time to adjust to; give yourself plenty of clearance when storing your tile saw so you can adapt to the odd weight ratio.

6. Bosch TC10 10-Inch Wet Tile

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The Bosch TC10 is an ideal stand for a homeowner planning a large flooring job, particularly if you’re working inside the home. The design features a large side tray and elevated back to reduce water spray and keep even large projects tidy.

This saw can be used as a traditional small fixed blade tile saw, or you can draw the blade forward for plunge cuts. Tilting for bevel cuts is quite simple thanks to the beveling tilt option on the motor head.

The Bosch TC10 is surprisingly lightweight for all its features and large deck. If you are seeking a saw with plenty of options and the capacity for 24″ tiles, the Bosch TC10 is a quality choice.

7. Kobalt 7-Inch Wet/Dry Tabletop Sliding Table Saw With Stand

best tile saw for home projects

The Kobalt 7-Inch Tile saw is a terrific DIY table saw with a helpful built-in laser guide for best accuracy. The AAA batteries needed to power the laser guide are included.

The Kobalt offers extenders on either side of the cutting deck for support on large tiles. The physical tile guide or rail can be moved to either side of the blade and the 45 degree angle miter guide slides so you can start clean and finish clean.

The deck or top of the Kobalt tilts to 22.5 degrees and 45 degrees for the best cuts no matter the angle you need. As an added safety feature, the Kobalt has a covered power switch, making it almost impossible to turn this saw on unintentionally.

8. MK Diamond MK-170 Tile Saw

best tile saw for home projects

If storage is limited, the MK-170 is an excellent choice. Additionally, this is a very lightweight machine, coming in at only 15 pounds when empty. If your lifting capacity is limited, this may be the best tile saw for you.

The blade guard on the MK-170 offers plenty of spatter protection while give you plenty of blade height to work with. The unit has a submersible pump for constant water delivery and smooth cutting.

Many of us who tile at home may have little assistants in the area, and water, electricity, saw blades and kids do not mix well. The MK-Safeswitch makes it possible for you to lock the machine down, so if you need to sketch out custom cuts, measure a new section, or just need a break, nobody can start the saw until you bring the key back.

9. Ryobi 7″ Tabletop Tile SawBest tile saw

 

The Ryobi Tabletop is an excellent choice for home tiling. It can handle tile up to 1-1/4 inches thick and features a stainless steel table, so no worries about corrosion.

The guide features an easy to adjust and lock down handle; no need to crank or tighten your guide into place. It’s either mobile or it’s locked in place.

The Ryobi offers a ripping deck that can handle 20″ straight cuts and 13″ on the diagonal. This large deck in combination with an extended thickness tolerance make this saw a great choice for a home tiler.

Related: Best Self Leveling Laser Reviews For DIY Builders

10. Ridgid 7″ Tile Saw With Stand

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The Ridgid 7″ saw has a quality jig for angled cuts, a tilting top for bevels and plenty of power. Speaking of which, the power switch turns on by lifting up, so no risk of accidental start-up.

This saw offers a clear splash hood for great visibility as you cut. You’ve got space for 18″ of straight cutting and 12″ of diagonal alignment. The Ridgid 7″ saw will cut 1 and 1/4 inches of tiling material.

Best of all, the miter guide on this tool has a lifting handle rather than a cranking handle and is made of die cast aluminum, not plastic. You won’t have any flexing or bowing as you work through long cuts.

Conclusion

The best wet tile saw for DIY is the one that fits your budget, project requirements and storage capabilities. Weight is also a critical factor; you need to be able to move your saw to a place where you can clean it, because tile sludge can turn to tile goo quickly.

Hosing out the tool is critical. Small, inexpensive saws can be a great way to start. When you’re ready for a larger tool, you’ll know.

Let us know if this list was helpful, and be sure to share photos of your project. Have fun!

bryan.rashon@gmail.com
 

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